Commuting and conversing

Sometimes the drive to school can be relaxing. Sometimes, it goes more like this.

This mornings car conversation.

🦑 oh, they have a whole series of these books. There’s an Introduction to Empiricism!

🤦🏾‍♀️ so what’s your understanding of empiricism?

🦑 only what I got from “Sophie’s World”, about trusting the evidence of your senses.

🤦🏾‍♀️ so would you say that empiricism is anthetical to relativism?

🦑 what is relativism?

🤦🏾‍♀️ remember yesterday on “The Philosophers Zone” they were talking about the dangers of philosophy in school, walking a tightrope between relativism and indoctrination? That indoctrination teaches that there is only a single truth, and relativism that a single truth is impossible.”

🦑 well, I suppose it is then

🤦🏾‍♀️ so would you include “thought” as a sensory experience for the purposes of that argument?

🦑 for the sake of the thought experiment, I think it’s easier to think of thought and sensory experience as different categories. It just makes it easier to think about.

So, how was your commute? 😂

Kid has a friend over

Kids refuse to go outside to play.

Adults threaten them with Star Trek if they won’t go outside. Kids accept Star Trek alternative and sit and wait for TV.

Adults then begin an in depth discussion of which series is the best place to start them, because TOS requires a historical context, and Next Gen has too many annoying characters, and Voyager is starting too late in the canon. And the movies are so wildly variable, you need a context to be able to make it through.

Kids go outside and play…

Homeschooling, day 479

Just making up numbers, because recording things isn’t one of my strong points.

Squid has been working on year 10 (ish) maths, building skills in patience, research, persistence and resilience. Finding out the skills you need to learn in the face of challenges, something that he hasn’t really been getting from school.

Here is a link to a video that demonstrates why not being challenged is a risk factor for gifted kids.

Right now he is rewriting “The Princess Bride” in Zero Language. Probably not useful from a creative writing perspective, but his handwriting is legible, so we are also calling that a win.

I really don’t give a rats about what level he is working at. What I care about is that he learns how to deal with barriers. How to persist when things get hard. How to use your brain to foster a growth mindset instead of just expecting life to be easy, and to turn to custard when you face a challenge.

We’ve been having lots of conversations about intrinsic Vs. extrinsic motivation, and how to get through the boring tasks so that you have time for the fun stuff. A lot of kids with ADHD struggle with repetitive, boring tasks, and executive function is something that we are explicitly attempting to deal with in our “year off”.

We don’t know yet what next year will look like. I know that Squid would love to go to AGE full time, and I honestly feel like a year of exploration and low demand would be good for the soul. But I can’t see us finding the $20k per year, and I also can’t quite let go of my expectations that he should be able to function in a “normal” school environment.

Maybe, a year of play and exploration will lead to more demand avoidance. But maybe, some cognitive skills training and raising expectations will see him able to integrate back into a mainstream school setting, albeit with a few accommodations.

One reason mainstream school needs to be part of the picture is because of his strong interest in science – teaching chemistry without a lab or a licence to buy chemicals (or having any expertise at all!) isn’t an idea I can get my head around.

This afternoon we switch from the psychology team to the neurodevelopmental team at the Kari Centre. The anxiety for which we were initially referred last year has all but disappeared since leaving school. Two weeks ago, at his own suggestion, Inigo has moved back into his own bedroom to sleep. At the same time, he said he didn’t need an adult to stay with him while he sent to sleep, and has mostly slept by himself all through the night without any input from a parent.

It smells like victory.