20 thoughts on “Freezer Paper in Australia?”

  1. I think freezer paper is the same as the wax paper our mum’s used to wrap our sammies (sammos) in for school.
    (also useful for making stained glass pictures – place autumn leaves between 2 sheets, wax side together and iron on low until they are stuck together

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  2. Spotlight sells freezer paper. I have never bought any. My impression of what freezer paper is that it’s just waxed on one side so you can use it as a stencil for printing on fabric.

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  3. To be honest, I’ve always been a bit too timid to ask the idiotic staff for something so esoteric. i was thrilled when I found it in the supermarket, but now Im worried that what I have bought will be useless for someone who never freezes steaks!

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  4. Sorry to tell you, it’s not the same stuff 😦 I bought some hoping it was but was disappointed. Freezer paper American style is paper with wax on only one side.

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  5. I am so confused, you can buy freeze paper at spotlight, I get that much, but the glad stuff isn’t the same? Correct? This is awesome, we need more original t-shirts.

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  6. I got the reynolds freezer paper from spotlight and paid $1.50 per m, it works for printing on fabric using a printer, but I can not find it in a super market in Adelaide so I have got some online from a shop in vic for $9.99 for 15 meters x 18 inches. here is the site

    http://www.usafoods.com.au/

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  7. This isn’t the same stuff but I tried it and it worked!!! What I did was put my material on the ironing board, cut a piece of the film slightly bigger than the material and placed that on top, the got some paper put that on top of the film, making sure no film was uncovered then with a hot iron, pressed it. The material stuck to the paper and I was able to put it though the printer to make my own material label. Woohoo! So It won’t work for stenciling but for appliqué it would work, and it certainly works for making fabric labels. It’s just a bit fiddley and I’d never put my iron directly onto the film. It would melt and make a horrible sticky mess on the hot plate. Hope that helps.

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  8. Tracey, I have been going round in circles for months asking people where I can buy proper freezer paper. Thank you so much for your post, I will get on to the website to-day. Hooray for women’s networks!

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  9. Tracey, thank you so much for your post on freezer paper. I have been going round in circles for months asking people where I can buy it. Thank goodness for women’s networks!

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  10. Reynolds freezer paper can be bought at USA foods in Moorabin Vic. You can get it online from here too if you don’t live near.

    Ali

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  11. I bought some at Spotlight it is last Sunday, “SewEasy” brand comes in a 45cm x 5m roll from the quilting department and cost $12.99. definatley not the same as go between sheets.

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  12. I needed quite a bit of freezer paper for a large scalloped border on a quilt. I wasn’t about to pay upwards of $15 for it so I started experimenting. I had no luck with the Glad go between as the stuff they make now is way thinner than it was a year ago. I tried coating paper with hairspray as I’d seen people using that for quilt basting but again, it didn’t work. However what did work was a gloopy solution of starch sprayed onto the back of normal copy paper. I used Blue Star starch that comes in a box (I can only find it in IGA stores in Sydney). You mix it with cold water then add boiling water. If you make it with only a half to a third of the recommended water, it becomes thick and gloopy. The water must be boiling and if it doesn’t go gloopy, stick it in the microwave for 10-20 seconds. The thicker the better but if it is too thick it won’t spray. Start with one third of the water and add a little more at the end if it is too thick to spray. Cut out your shape from paper, spray the back liberally with the starch and immediately press it face down onto the back of the fabric with a hot iron. Iron it until the paper is dry. Water it down more and it makes a good, cheap ironing spray. water it down a little, spray and iron a couple of times instead of liquid stabiliser for heirloom sewing as it washes out. It leaves no residue and faintly smells like laundry detergent. A box of blue star sets you back less than $5 and as you only use a small amount at a time, it lasts for years. I’m still on my first box!

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